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StaySafe helps Ericsson stay connected and protect lone workers, even in low signal areas

Ericsson is a provider of technology, infrastructure and services to telecommunications operators around the world. As the world’s largest supplier of mobile networks, Ericsson provides mobile and broadband connections to more than 2 billion people globally.

Remote communications

In the UK, Ericsson has a team of over 500 lone workers who carry out maintenance services across the country. Working around the clock and in remote locations, lone working engineers use StaySafe to check-in with their supervisors while they work.

Ericsson has always recognised the importance of monitoring the safety of their lone workers and staying connected whenever they are out in the field. The business has its own in-house response team but needed a more reliable way for its employees to alert them in an emergency. Read more

Country and Outback Health Community Workers using StaySafe even in low signal and remote areas

Country and Outback Health protect lone workers with smartphone app even in isolated areas with poor signal

CoBH-Logo-transRegional primary health care organisation, Country and Outback Health (COBH) use the StaySafe app and cloud-based monitoring hub to ensure their employees, including their community nurses and other community workers, are safe when visiting clients alone.

COBH was set up by the Australian Government to better organise and manage local front-line health services. They run Partners in Recovery (PIR) which offers personalised mental health support to individuals across a vast geographical footprint and over isolated Outback areas.

Working alone in roles that include closed-door situations and periods of travel, means that PIR staff are more vulnerable to certain safety risks. These risks include aggressive behaviour, hostage situations and road accidents, all of which are unpredictable and sometimes difficult to control. Read more

Beating the mobile blackspot with SMS and satellite options

The ‘mobile blackspot’ – those annoying pockets where you can’t connect to the network, rendering your top of the range smartphone or device useless when you need to make a call. This is of course particularly pertinent if you are trying to use your phone to call or signal for help in an emergency.

Luckily, mobile and internet coverage around the world is continuously expanding. According to Statista.com, the number of mobile phone users in the world is expected to pass the five billion mark by 2019. In 2014, nearly 60 per cent of the population worldwide owned a mobile phone. Penetration is forecast to continue to grow, going up to 67 per cent by 2019 – which gives a good indication of how much of the world we can reasonably expect to be able to use a mobile device in. Read more